WORLDWIDE – Holiday Season May Delay Work Permit/Visa Application Processing

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Government offices generally are short-staffed or close during the holiday season. As a result, processing delays should be expected for visa and work permit applications during the months of December and January, particularly in Latin America and Europe.
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College Admission EssayCollege Admission Essay Topic
IN ORDER FOR THE ADMISSIONS STAFF OF OUR COLLEGE TO GET TO KNOW YOU, THE APPLICANT, BETTER, WE ASK THAT YOU ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTION:

ARE THERE ANY SIGNIFICANT EXPERIENCES YOU HAVE HAD, OR ACCOMPLISHMENTS YOU HAVE REALIZED, THAT HAVE HELPED TO DEFINE YOU AS A PERSON?

Following is the Best College Admission Essay I have ever read. Truly reflects a personality, in fact most of us and what we aspire to be. The last paragraph is the most important. However, read through this

IDENTITY THEFT
What is identity theft?
How it happens?
What to do if it happens to you?
How to prevent it?

WHAT IS IDENTITY THEFT?
Identity theft occurs when a person’s identity is stolen for the purpose of opening credit accounts, stealing money from existing accounts, applying for loans, even renting apartments or committing crimes.

Victims of identify theft often aren’t aware that they’ve been targeted until they find unknown charges on their bank or credit card statements, are called by a collections agency or are denied credit.

HOW IDENTITY THEFT HAPPENS
Here are some of the most common ways identity thieves can gain access to your information. They:

• Steal wallets and purses containing your identification, credit and bank cards
• Steal your mail, including bank and credit card statements, phone bills and tax information
• Complete a “change of address form” to divert your mail to another location
• Steal or illegally purchase personal information you share on the Internet
• Call you claiming to be a well know reputable company, asking for personal information.
• Send you an email, which appears to be from a reputable company, asking to respond or go to a web site and provide your personal information. This practice is know as “phishing” (pronounced “fishing”)
• Set up bogus web sites that look like familiar legitimate sites and ask you to provide personal information. This practice is known as “spoofing”.
How to Protect yourself from Identity Theft

This guide will help you take action to protect yourself against identity theft. If you’ve already been victimized, this guide will provide information about restoring your credit profile and minimize the potential for any future occurrences of identify theft.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU’VE BECOME A VICTIM OF IDENTITY THEFT?
1. Contact one of the three credit bureaus to request that an initial 90-day fraud alert be added to your personal file. By requesting a 90-day fraud alert, anyone seeking credit in your name will have to have their identity verified. The credit bureau you contact will forward the fraud alert to the remaining two credit bureaus automatically. Once you place the fraud alert in your file you are entitled to a free credit report.

The information for each of the three bureaus is as follows:
Equifax
(800) 525-6285
Post Office Box 740241
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
http://www.equifax.com

Experian
(888) 397-3742
Post Office Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
http://www.experian.com

TransUnion
(800) 680-7289
Fraud Victim Assistance Division
Post Office Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
http://www.transunion.com

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced today that it is extending its Premium Processing Service to three new types of employment-based immigrant petitions. As of September 25, 2006, premium processing – which allows U.S. employers to pay a $1,000 premium processing fee in exchange for processing within 15 calendar days – will be available for the following petition types: (1) first preference outstanding professors and researchers; (2) second preference members of professions with advanced degrees or exceptional ability, except National Interest Waiver cases; and (3) third preference workers not classifiable as skilled workers or professionals (also referred to as “other workers”).