Almost everyone has a credit card these days. Infact almost everyone has multiple credit cards these days especially students. We blogged earlier showing you guys the best credit cards for students. But for many college students credit cards may be in too many places, and the future can include high debt that cripples credit ratings and erases eligibility for loans.

Credit card company data shows more students possess credit cards than at any other time in history, and students are using their credit cards with increasing frequency. These are the days of 0% credit cards offering 0% balance transfers. That’s good for everyone: students gain convenience, the credit card companies build future customer bases and merchants sell more goods and services. But both sides also have a lot to lose if the students who spend, spend, spend today are unable to pay, pay, pay tomorrow.

But we are going to talk about another serious issue today. Credit card fraud. We see headlines such as “13 People Indicted in New York City in $3 Million ID Theft Ring” , “Corporate Owner of T.J. Maxx, Marshall’s Says Information for 45.7 Million Cardholders Stolen” , “New Yorkers, Californians at Highest Risk for Identity Theft, Hundreds of Missing Passport Applications Found at Los Angeles Airport” ,  “Boeing Corporate Laptop Stolen; 382,000 Identities at Risk” and more everyday.

In this post we want to share with you a story of a fellow student, who tells us not about her problem with too many credit cards but another serious issue, credit card fraud … in her own words.

Book Ends : Returning your texts to the bookstore is the least creative way to end a semester. 

Exams are finally over and it’s time to unload your used books. If you’re like most students, you’re probably dreading the moment of truth.

    You: Hello, good-looking bookstore associate! How are you today? Here are my used books and the receipts.

    Clerk: I’ll give you $20 for all of them, except those really heavy ones you lugged over here.

    You: But I paid $400 for them four months ago, and I never even opened them up!

    Clerk: Next in line, please.

We all know how bad it feels to end up with $20 in your pocket and a pile of heavy books at your feet. What now?

That depends on whether you want to make sure your books don’t go to waste, or whether you’re just concerned about getting your cash back.

Used College Textbooks in a bookstoreWaste Not, Want Not
If you want to make sure your books are put to good use, you have lots of options. Plenty of students would be happy to use your books, no matter what condition they’re in. Professors often assign the same titles year after year and will be happy to pass your tomes on to students who later take the same class. The administrative assistant in your major department can also help you donate books to younger students in your field.

Textbook Tech
Having trouble selling your textbooks? Let the Internet sell them for you.

Some School-operated Sites
Some schools have Web-based book-selling programs which allow students to buy and sell books. Your school may have one you can use. If not, one listed below might come in handy. Check the system before you try another school’s electronic book-selling system, though; some sell only by course. Also remember the rate of mailing the book over long distances may not make a long-distance purchase worth your effort, even if you mail it by book rate.
Texas Tech University
University of Texas
Boston University

Students are deluged with credit card offers, some worthwhile and some not. Here’s what we discovered about the world of credit.

Student Credit cardsHouse of Cards Visa is “everywhere you want to be” and Mastercard is “the future of money,” according to their ads. But for many college students credit cards may be in too many places, and the future can include high debt that cripples credit ratings and erases eligibility for loans.

Credit card company data shows more students possess credit cards than at any other time in history, and students are using their cards with increasing frequency. That’s good for everyone: students gain convenience, the credit card companies build future customer bases and merchants sell more goods and services. But both sides also have a lot to lose if the students who spend, spend, spend today are unable to pay, pay, pay tomorrow.

With credit card companies aggressively targeting the college market, the convenience and buying power of credit cards are readily accessible to most students. However, not all students who receive credit cards realize the responsibilities that go with them.

For Ron Nixon, a student at John Jay College in New York, having credit available all the time proved disastrous. After ringing up $10,000 in debt, Nixon was forced to leave school to pay off his balance.

“The first credit card I had was the beginning of the end. That one led to another card, and then another and another. Eventually I had 19 credit cards,” Nixon said.

What Nixon didn’t realize is that a credit card is essentially a pre-approved, rolling loan that you can use to purchase any number of items. The credit card company lets you charge up to your loan limit, and then you have to pay it back. If you can’t, you’ll pay a very high rate of interest — often 18 to 22 percent a year for students.

Sure, it’s important to start investing young, but are bonds, stocks or mutual funds the best investment for us? And what the hell does liquid have to do with it?

investing money in collegeYou’re sitting in a big sterile lecture hall Monday morning listening to your professor’s droning yet all you can think about is how you’re going to make it through the week with $5. Your ever-dwindling savings account is down to a measly $30. Yet you’ve still got an ominous stack of credit card, phone, cable and electric bills collecting dust on the corner of your desk, and it’ll be weeks before your next paycheck arrives.

How nice would it be if you just won a million dollars in the lottery and didn’t have any financial worries. Unfortunately, the chances of this are almost zero. Solving your financial woes may take a little more initiative than buying tonight’s winning ticket.

Sooner or later everyone needs to think about how to secure their financial future. Maybe you’re a lucky graduate who’s already got a job lined up. Or you’ve been working hard at school and managed to save a little extra money. Or maybe an awesome paid internship will cover your expenses. Whatever your situation, choosing to invest early is the best way for you to guarantee your financial security. In investing, time is your best friend.

You’ve probably heard some well-established middle-aged acquaintance mention their investments from time to time — a certain mutual fund, an IRA plan, a hot stock. If the words are just words to you, read on. But considering the possible rewards, taking time to look at things now will pay off later on. Once you know some basic info, stashing away hard-earned money doesn’t have to be hard.

Investing is putting your money to work to make more money. There are tons of ways to do this, all with different payoffs.

Gambling’s entertaining for most students, but an unlucky few can get hooked on the high.Know when to hold ’em, know when to fold ’em.

Gambling and PokerRandy McNally doesn’t have to look very far for a game to bet on. 

“It is all a matter of knowing where to look,” said McNally, a sophomore at the University of California at Berkeley. “It is all over campus, but it is not a problem all over campus. Just some people have a problem — and the rest of us are enjoying penny poker.”

Just as social smokers light up at a bar on weekend nights or during a deep coffeehouse conversation, most social gamblers flirt with the game in an on-again, off-again way. They’re not addicted, and they find betting entertaining.

“Gambling can have a good side and provides a very popular recreational activity for millions and millions of people,” said Stanley Sludikoff, the editor and publisher of the industry newspaper Gambling Times. “It is only when the person starts to let gambling cause serious harm in his or her life that a problem exists.”