The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics reported a jump of more than 11% in IT employment from April to May of this year. And research conducted by Robert Half Technology supports the notion that job growth will remain fairly robust: Our most recent IT Hiring Index and Skills Report indicates that 13% of U.S. CIOs plan to add technology staffers over the next three months, while only 3% anticipate cutbacks. The net 10% increase is up two percentage points from the previous forecast. It seems all signs point to brisk hiring in the IT field.

But are you still having trouble finding a job?

Say a job requires an experienced DBA. You might be having a lot of experience in this field right from the days you managed the SQL Server in your high school. However, you have been in the hunt for months and still did not receive any enquiries from prospective employers. Is this a general description or is this a story about you? Check out the rest of this article on why you might be having trouble finding a new position and some tips to put you back on the right track

Are you Marketable?

We see stories about the strong job demand and the strong requirement for IT talent. However, at the same time, companies are not hiring at the same insane pace like pre bubble period, the glory days before 2000 where people with little skills could have demanded multiple offers. Today’s managers require you to be aware of the latest technologies, on job experience, track record of successfull projects, business skills and the ability to make immediate impact. In the DBA example mentioned above, maybe you have strong SQL skills but no idea of Oracle which might be essential to many hiring managers. Think about what employers in your area seek, and then evaluate where gaps exist in your skills or experience and how you can fill them.

You look for jobs on the Internet

While the Internet has made it a lot easier for people to search and apply for jobs, the same cannot be said of them actually landing the jobs. As an IT professional, you might be heavily biased in favor of using technology to land your next job, but the bottom line: According to an article in The New York Times, only 3% to 5% of job seekers locate a new position through online sites.

Supplement your efforts through non online means like contacting members of your local chapter of professional associations like ACM or IEEE, attend industry events or professional events for leads and advice and also maybe signing up with a staffing firm. Remember, most often that not, your networking skills might help you land a job far easier and faster. Use the Internet to research potential employers, determine which companies are hiring and locate positions specific to your area.

Look around you. Computers and networks are everywhere, enabling an intricate web of complex human activities: education, commerce, entertainment, research, manufacturing, health management, human communication, even war. Of the two main technological underpinnings of this amazing proliferation, one is obvious: The breathtaking pace with which advances in microelectronics and chip design have been bringing us faster and faster hardware. This book tells the story of the other intellectual enterprise which is crucially fueling the computer revolution: Efcient algorithms. It is a fascinating story. Come close and listen good …

Look around you. Computers and networks are everywhere, enabling an intricate web of complex human activities: education, commerce, entertainment, research, manufacturing, health management, human communication, even war. Of the two main technological underpinnings of this amazing proliferation, one is obvious: The breathtaking pace with which advances in microelectronics and chip design have been bringing us faster and faster hardware. This book tells the story of the other intellectual enterprise which is crucially fueling the computer revolution: Efcient algorithms. It is a fascinating story. Come close and listen good …

For the best part of this year and most of last year, the new buzz word is Web 2.0. Web 2.0 has come to represent a new generation of web technologies to the developers and the social community alike. Web 2.0 while representing large fonts and bright colors and curvy corners, also ushers in a new age of standards such as CSS, XHTML, data transfer and sharing standards like XML and accessibility standards for the visually impaired(remember the Target fiasco). There exists this delicate balance between creativity and supporting standards and this is hard to achieve and for the longest time, one tool has dominated the web design and development world was Macromedia Dreamweaver. Adobe scooped up Macromedia and trying to drive the next generation web development through further upgrades of Dreamweaver. It seems that Microsoft got tired of relying on FrontPage and is actually going after professionals.Microsoft finally drank the Kool-Aid. Now, Microsoft has entered the arena with Expression Web Designer which walks the Web standards walk. But is it a worthy competitor or just a new technology out there? We at Askstudent looked at the latest beta release(CTP) of Expression web designer and perform a comparison of Microsoft’s product with Adobe Dreamweaver 8, the latest stable release of Dreamweaver.

Installation

You can download the latest Beta release of Microsoft Expression Web from Microsoft’s Expression Site. I installed this with my OS as Windows Vista RC2 and I was running the Office 2007 Beta 2 Technical Refresh. The only thing you need to take care of is if you did not upgrade to technical refresh of the Office 2007 version, you might want to do so. Also, you need to download and install .Net Framework 2.0, but , if you have Vista installed, Framework 2.0 is already installed. Downside: There is no OSX version which is negative as most of the web design community tends to use an Apple machine. However, with Bootcamp, this problem can be mitigated on an Apple machine. Again, Microsoft’s expression is Windows only and according to Microsoft, there is no planned release for OS X any time soon.